The World’s Biggest Passenger Plane

Last week, the Emirates airline showed off its newest plane that will soon begin to service Logan Airport- a massive A380. Massport spent $30 million renovating Terminal E to accommodate it.A private cabin on the upper level.

Made by Airbus, the wide-body A380 is the largest passenger plane in the world, with two levels, semi-private suites, shower spas, and an on-board lounge.

The A380 that’s flying into Boston is currently configured to seat 491 passengers, with 14 private suites, 76 business class seats, and 401 economy seats.

Massport had to add new jet bridges to three gates at Terminal E to accommodate the two tiers of the new A380, which is about 16 feet taller than a 747. The wingspan of the massive aircraft, which can weigh as much as 575 metric tons, is about 262 feet.

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Airbnb’s Influence on Hotel Occupancy Threatens Industry Profits

Business Travel News says a report from Morgan Stanley Research suggests that a decline during 2016 in the number of compression nights at U.S. hotels could indicate a significant threat to the industry from alternative accommodation providers like Airbnb.

Last year, compression nights, defined as nights when hotel occupancy is greater than 95 percent, fell 17 percent year over year among the 25 U.S. markets with the most hotel rooms. That is the first time that’s happened since 2009. Additionally, though occupancy remained more than 1 percent higher in 2016 than in 2014, compression nights dipped 8 percent below 2014 levels.

But are Airbnb and its counterparts to blame for fewer compression room nights? The signs point to yes, according to Morgan Stanley.Morgan Stanley found that Airbnb use rose from 12 percent of travelers in 2015 to 18 percent in 2016. That trend, the firm says, is expected to continue in 2017.

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Global In-Flight Wi-Fi Coverage Will Grow in 2017

Business Travel News reported on the expansion of in-flight wi-fi.

In-flight Wi-Fi is available on 39 percent of available seat miles globally and 83 percent of U.S. carriers’ ASMs, according to Routehappy’s 2017 Wi-Fi Report.

Globally, the number of carriers that offer in-flight Wi-Fi is 70, 11 more than at this time last year. Coverage should increase further this year, as several major global airlines reached agreements in 2016 to add or expand Wi-Fi, according to the report. “2016 was the year that airlines outside the U.S. committed to high-quality in-flight Wi-Fi at a rate only previously seen by U.S. carriers, and 2017 will see those commitments come to life,” Routehappy CEO Robert Albert said.

Delta, United Airlines and Emirates offer the most Wi-Fi-enabled ASMs. Virgin America was the only U.S. carrier to have Wi-Fi available on 100 percent of its flights, according to Routehappy. Alaska Airlines acquired Virgin America in December. As the report came out, JetBlue announced completion of Wi-Fi installation on all its planes, though the service is available only when flying above the contiguous U.S. On flights longer than 2,800 miles, Emirates, United and Lufthansa have the most expansive Wi-Fi offerings, the report indicated.

Airbnb’s Influence on Hotel Occupancy Threatens Industry Profits

A report from Morgan Stanley Research suggests that a decline during 2016 in the number of compression nights at U.S. hotels could indicate a significant threat to the industry from alternative accommodation providers like Airbnb.

But are Airbnb and its counterparts to blame for fewer compression room nights? The signs point to yes, according to Morgan Stanley. In another report—titled Who Will Airbnb Hurt More—Hotels or OTAs? … One Year Later—Morgan Stanley found that Airbnb use rose from 12 percent of travelers in 2015 to 18 percent in 2016. That trend, the firm says, is expected to continue in 2017.

For more, click here.