Extending a Business Trip for Fun is Becoming Increasingly Popular

The practice of adding a few days of pleasure to a work trip is becoming increasingly popular. The Global Business Travel Association was the latest to research this trend. Its survey of North American business travelers found that 37% had extended a work trip to include some leisure within the past year. This, typically, might mean stretching a break in a city into the weekend, possibly shipping in the family to join the fun. Often, such travelers will stay in the same hotel for the duration, making up the extra cost themselves.

Should companies embrace the idea of “bleisure”? Maybe so! It might save some money. Extending a stay can mean that an expensive Friday morning flight is substituted for a cheaper weekend one, or a cheaper day-rate on a longer hotel booking can be negotiated. At its best, it might help keep employees’ enthusiasm for a life on the road kindled.

See more from The Economist here.

New App Rewards Business Travelers

A new app could reward you for making cheaper purchases all while giving you control over your travel budget. TravelBank estimates trip cost based on travel dates, destinations, current market prices and company travel policies.

Once the employee has their travel budget, they can visualize it on their device and customize their business trip by choosing to splurge or save on certain expenses like flights, hotels, ground transportation and food.

TravelBank encourages road warriors to stay under budget by having their company split the savings with them in the form of credits. For example, if a user’s trip comes in $500 under budget, they’ll receive $250 in credit to use with TravelBank partners like Uber, Lyft and Airbnb.

See more from Travel Pulse here.

New App Empowers, Rewards Business Travelers

Facial Recognition Technology Rolling Out

Airlines such as Delta and Emirates are introducing facial recognition technology. In May, Delta announced the launch of its new, self-service bag drop powered by facial recognition technology, the first of its kind at U.S. airports.

Rather than handing over your luggage to a Delta agent, you’ll check it in yourself — as a computer scans your face to confirm that you are who you say you are.

The pilot program will begin at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport this summer. The airline spent $600,000 on its four new self-service stations, one of which uses facial recognition technology to match customers with their passport photos.

See more from CBS News here.