New York is the most expensive city in the world for business travel

The Washington Post takes a look at the most expensive cities for business travel. The Global Business Travel Association, a travel industry trade group, predicts business in the corporate travel sector will have increased between six and seven percent by 2019 and 2020.

Using data compiled from Business Travel News’ Corporate Travel Index, Expert Market, a business-to-business office equipment marketer, has concluded that three American cities take the top spots. New York City wins the crown. The typical business traveler spends about $549 per day in New York, compared to $534 in San Francisco and $511 in Boston. Tokyo and Zurich round out the top five. Washington and Chicago are also in the top 10.

So what’s the cheapest American city for business travel? At only $241 per day, less than half of New York, that would be Bakersfield, Calif.–a two-hour drive north of Los Angeles.

See more from the Washington Post here.

Business Travel Habits by Generation

Travel Pulse takes us through details of the generational divide in how road warriors approach business travel. Carlson Wagonlit Travel’s recent Connected Traveler Study reveals the difference in millennial travel with the habits of other generations.

Millennials are far more likely to travel in groups than their Generation X or baby boomer counterparts. Nearly six out of 10 millennials travel with others while on a business trip while more than 70 percent of baby boomers travel alone. Gen-Xers are less likely to travel alone (58 percent) but also less likely than millennials to travel with a colleague or family member on business. 

Travelers between the ages of 24 and 34 are also more likely to contact family, friends, co-workers and clients when they travel. Nearly half of millennials reach out to friends or family more than once per day while our for work, compared to just 38 percent of Gen-Xers and 29 percent of baby boomers.

The trend is reflected in how the three generations interact with clients and colleagues, with millennials 20 percent more likely to connect during travel compared to baby boomers. When they do connect to family and friends from the road, older generations are more likely to pick up the phone than millennials. Millennials tend to turn to Skype at a much higher rate than Gen-Xers and baby boomers. Yet, all three generations prefer email when communicating with colleagues.

See more here